CFP: Disrupting Media Infrastructures

Call for submissions to Northern Lights, Volume 17, 2019 – Theme issue on:

Disrupting media infrastructures: Transforming media industries and public spheres

Volume editors: Kirsten Frandsen and Stig Hjarvard

During the recent decades digitization has enabled a fundamental disruption of many parts of the existing communication infrastructure of both the media industries and the larger society. Technological and institutional structures that have hitherto served as the underlying framework for mainly nationally oriented media systems have been disrupted by the emergence of new digital production, distribution, and communication technologies and business models. Media act in a double role as both objects of transformation an as agents of the disruptive forces with consequences for individual media’s performance and for the overall media structure and its interfaces with the wider society. Older media organizations and professions are struggling not only to develop new business models but also to invent new forms of content and ways of reaching and engaging users. As a result, new forms of distribution, new strategic alliances, and new types of collaboration are emerging nationally and transnationally. Furthermore, the ability to steer developments through national public policies has diminished, leaving regulators and policy makers with still fewer options to influence the communicative infrastructure of society.

Disruption is often related to changing distribution models, including the general transition from push to pull modes of distribution. Public and private broadcasters’ live and flow based services are giving way to on-demand and streaming services. Legacy news media are losing control over their distribution platforms (newspapers and websites) when audiences increasingly find their news through social network media. The ubiquity of digital media has made data about audiences and users a key commodity and the automated and intelligent processing of information about users’ digital footprints allows for much more sophisticated forms of marketing, targeting individual users with customized advertising and content recommendations. Disruption has often been instigated by global agents such as Google, Facebook, and Amazon that in some regions of the world have acquired near-monopoly status within particular areas such as search-based advertising, social network media, and online shopping. These companies’ control over key networks and technologies raises a series of questions regarding the national media companies’ ability to successfully adapt to a digital infrastructure. Especially because the global companies are now using their distribution-based wealth to establish themselves as important media content producers in genres such as television drama series and news.

The consequences of disruption are manifold and appear within several domains. Within media industries the disruption of the value chain entails the break-up of existing models and circuits of production and distribution making existing professional skills and values (e.g. within journalism) obsolete and prompting industries to look for new types of competences (e.g. within computer technology) and new types of collaborative partnerships and sources of revenue. At the societal level the communicative infrastructure for governance is being altered, including the ways in which media systems are able to sustain a democratic public sphere. With the growing role of social network media and on-demand services, the existing rationalities for public service media are increasingly being tested. Disruption as a socio-economic phenomenon therefore raises questions that are not limited to the media industry: How is the global context and push towards neoliberal policies affecting national political governance of media systems both ideologically and in practice?

Northern Light calls for papers exploring how disruption of the media infrastructure relates to transformation both within media industries and in a wider societal context. Research topics may include but are not restricted to:

  • Changes in media business models and challenges for legacy news media and public service media.
  • Development of push and pull models of media content distribution
  • Media content production for on-demand audiences and users
  • Emerging strategic alliances and collaborations in distribution and/or content production
  • Global tech companies and their influence on disruption of global and national media markets
  • Datafication and the value of consumer intelligence; new forms of audience/user data gathering
  • Transforming advertising: the demise of mass media models of advertising, search based advertising models, etc.
  • The political economy of disruption: the interplay between globalization, neoliberal policies, and technology development
  • Changes of the media infrastructure and the implication for the performance of the public sphere

Considering the overall theme of this volume, all submissions must analytically or theoretically be committed to engage with the processes and effects of ‘disruption’.

Submissions

Please send an extended abstract of 500-600 words to volume editors Associate Professor Kirsten Frandsen (imvkf@cc.au.dk) and Professor Stig Hjarvard (stig@hum.ku.dk).

Deadline for abstract submission: 15 March, 2018

Time Schedule

Notification to authors about acceptance: 15 April 2018

Final article submission:  25 August, 2018

Publication: Spring 2019

Peer review

The journal is using anonymous peer review of the final submission, two for each article. Initial acceptance of abstract to submit a full article does not guarantee publication. Final acceptance of an article is dependent on both the outcome of peer reviews and the editors’ decision.

About the journal

Northern Lights is a peer reviewed international journal dedicated to studies of media. The yearbook is a meeting place for Nordic, European and global perspectives on media. The editors stress the importance of interdisciplinary research and the journal focuses on the interplay between media and their cultural and social context. Media have emerged as important institutions of modern society at the same time as mobile and interactive media technologies become integrated into the fabric of the wider culture and society. The development of new social networks, changes in political communication and governance, and the changing relationship between art, culture, and commercial markets are important aspect of these new dynamics.

Political Communication in Networked Societies

New volume of Northern Lights

Volume editors: Eli Skogerbø and Risto Kunelius
ISSN: 1601829X. Online ISSN: 20400586. Volume 15, issue 1, chief editor: Stig Hjarvard.
Website at Intellect Press: https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=3367/


Table of content

Editorial: Introduction – political communication in networked societies. Authors: Skogerbø, Eli; Kunelius, Risto.

Political communication in an age of visual connectivity: Exploring Instagram practices among Swedish politicians. Authors: Ekman, Mattias; Widholm, Andreas.

Facebook and local newspapers’ effect on local politicians’ popularity. Authors: Elvestad, Eiri; Johannessen, Marius Rohde.

Translocal empowerment communication: Mediated networks of civil society organizations for political empowerment. Author: Kannengießer, Sigrid.

Video activism in the Brazilian protests: Genres, narratives and political participation. Authors: de Sousa, Ana Lúcia Nunes; Cervi, Laura.

Image, self-presentation and political communication in the age of interconnection: An alternative understanding of the mediatization of politics. Author: Archetti, Cristina.

The mediatization of politics in the hybrid media system: The case of Italian political journalism. Authors: Splendore, Sergio; Rega, Rossella.

Facebook and political participation: Going beyond over-optimistic predictions. Author: Casteltrione, Isidoropaolo.

The world as seen by a Prime Minister: Italian PM Matteo Renzi on his spin doctor’s Instagram page. Author: Buscemi, Francesco.

Postdoc søges til humanistisk erhvervsforskningsprojekt

Det Humanistiske Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, søger postdoc, der skal skabe ny viden om danske små og mellemstore virksomheders kunder og bygge bro mellem erhvervsliv og universitet.

Ved Institut for Medier, Erkendelse og Formidling opslås en tre-årig stilling som postdoc inden for digitale medier og samarbejde til besættelse pr. 1. november 2017 eller snarest derefter.

Flere oplysninger her, http://jobportal.ku.dk/videnskabelige-stillinger/?show=145416

CFP: Surveillance: Through media, by media, in media

Call for submissions to Northern Lights, Volume 16 – Theme issue on:

Surveillance: Through media, by media, in media

Volume editors: Göran Bolin and Anne Jerslev

Following the spread of digital media, the interdisciplinary field of surveillance studies has raised a prominent agenda, engaging scholars from the humanities and the social sciences alike. Although surveillance as an activity presupposes the involvement of media technologies and images and often involves media organizations, the specific role of the media in these activities has not been sufficiently dealt with.

The increased opportunities for corporate businesses and state administrations to monitor customer and citizen behavior around the clock raise a range of media-related questions of ethical, legislative and political nature, concerning privacy, citizenry, power and individual rights vs. the common good included in an open digital information architecture. However, surveillance is also present in the media, aesthetically and thematically. The increased possibility of surveillance and the many levels of monitoring made possible in society are critically examined and challenged in contemporary media practices. What could be labeled a ‘surveillance aesthetics’ seems to be part and parcel of communicative strategies and audiovisual experiments in photography, film and television series – from constructions of different panoptic points of view to embodied, subjective points of view – just like surveillance is prominent as theme, discourse and narrative structure in a range of programs on diverse platforms as well as in news media.

For this issue of Northern Lights, we invite articles that critically analyze and discuss the role of media in various forms of monitoring and surveillance in society. This includes issues regarding the ways media technologies both enact and facilitate surveillance and how different media genres, platforms and technologies facilitate monitoring such as the corporate monitoring of media audiences, media users and customers through various forms of (big) data. Moreover, articles may discuss one or more of political and ethical themes raised by mediated surveillance on different levels from discussions of national and transnational privacy protection laws to discussions of everyday practices within an environment characterized by ubiquitous surveillance technologies. Finally, articles may discuss how surveillance functions as (audio)visual practices.

Themes include (but are not restricted to):

  • Surveillance aesthetics in (audio)visual media
  • Surveillance and privacy
  • Surveillance and social media platforms
  • Media historical perspectives on monitoring and surveillance
  • Analyses of systems of monitoring and surveillance in relation to digital media
  • Distinctions between audience analysis and surveillance
  • Media coverage of surveillance post-Snowden
  • Analysis of attitudes to surveillance and monitoring by different groups of new media users
  • Sousveillance and the critique of power
  • Panspectric practices in marketing
  • The role of big data in surveillance systems

Please send an extended abstract of 500-600 words to volume editor Professor Göran Bolin: goran.bolin@sh.se

Deadline for abstract submission: 3 April 2017
Notification to authors: 21 April 2017
Final article submission: 1 September 2017
Publication: Spring 2018

Additional information about the journal is available on Intellect’s website:
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=143/view,page=2/

 

Referat fra SMiDs generalforsamling 2016

Her kommer referatet fra SMiDs generalforsamling, som foregik på SMiDs årsmøde i Middelfart 27-28. oktober: 161027_smid-generalforsamling-referat

Tak til alle jer, der deltog i årsmødet. Vi var 55 tilmeldte, som deltog med én keynote, fire paneler og 21 paper-præsentationer – det var et flot fremmøde, og vi i bestyrelsen synes, at både det faglige og sociale niveau var ganske højt! Årsmødet bød foruden præsentationen af aktuel forskning på bl.a. besøg af Ingela Wadbring fra Nordicom samt uddeling af SMiD-prisen, som i år gik til Ib Bondebjerg for lang og tro tjeneste i den danske medieforskning.

Som det fremgår af referatet, er der valgt en ny bestyrelse. Den består af Gry Høngsmark Knudsen (SDU), Stinne Gunder Strøm Krogager (AAU), Julie Mejse Münter Lassen og Aske Kammer (ITU) samt Maja Sonne Damkjær (AU) og Janne Nielsen (AU) som suppleanter. Vi konstituerer os ved førstkommende bestyrelsesmøde, som finder sted primo januar – indtil da fortsætter Aske Kammer som fungerende formand for foreningen. Med fire personer i bestyrelsen er der én tom plads, som vi søger af fylde ud senere.

Husk, at SMiD er til stede på de sociale medier, hvor der bl.a. foregår en god vidensdeling om aktuelle konferencer, etc., på især https://www.facebook.com/groups/16992519211/. Og husk også at sætte kryds i kalenderen til NordMedia-konferencen, som afholdes i Tampere 17.-19. august 2017. Der kommer call for papers ud i starten af det nye år.

Vi ses. Om ikke før, så til årsmøde og generalforsamling i 2018.

God jul og godt nytår til jer alle.

New volume of Northern Lights: Film and Media Studies Yearbook

Northern Lights coverTelevision drama in the age of media convergence

Volume editors: Gunhild Agger and Mette Mortensen.

Chief editor: Stig Hjarvard. ISSN: 1601829X. Online ISSN: 20400586. Volume 14, issue 1, Intellect Press:

http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=3136/

 

Contents

Gunhild Agger and Mette Mortensen: ”Television drama in the age of media convergence”

Vilde Schanke Sundet: ”Still ‘Desperately seeking the audience’? Audience making in the age of media convergence (the Lilyhammer experience)”

Jakob Isak Nielsen: ”Points of contact, points of distance: DR/TV 2 meet HBO/Netflix”

Lothar Mikos: ”Television drama series and transmedia storytelling in an era of convergence”

Heidi Keinonen: ”From serial drama to transmedia storytelling: How to re-articulate television aesthetics in the post-broadcast era”

Gunhild Agger: ”The development of transnationality in Danish Noir – from Unit One to The Team”

Casper Tybjerg: ”Devil-nets of clues: True Detective and the search for meaning”

Ushma Chauhan Jacobsen and Pia Majbritt Jensen: ”Born European, born regional, or born global? Language convergence in The Team”

Michael L. Wayne: ”Post-network audiences and cable crime drama”

Jackie Raphael and Celia Lam Marvel: ”Media convergence: Cult following and buddy banter”

Ny udgave af Dansk mediehistorie Bind 4

Klaus Bruhn (red.)
Dansk mediehistorie 4, 1995-2015
350 sider / 358 kr. (vejl.)
2. udg. (2016)
ISBN 9788759319857
Samfundslitteratur

Fra begyndelsen af 1990’erne skete der dybtgående og langsigtede forandringer af mediernes placering i det danske samfund. Internettet, e-mail, web, sociale medier og i stigende grad mobile tjenester blev en fast bestanddel af hverdagen, erhvervslivet og den offentlige forvaltning. Imens fik de gamle medier travlt med at finde deres plads i et digitaliseret og integreret mediemiljø.
Konkurrencen mellem public service og kommercielle radio- og tv-stationer blev videreført online, ligesom dagbladene markedsførte sig gennem netudgaver. Også bogen overlevede, til dels via netsalg og som e-bog, mens ugeblade og magasiner kunne tilbyde flere forskellige slags oplevelser på glittet papir og alle slags skærme. Dansk film fejrede særlige triumfer, ikke blot på verdens festivaler, men også i danske biografer og danske hjem på dvd og gennem streaming. Reklamen var nu mindre et politisk stridspunkt end et kulturelt vilkår på tværs af platforme.
Alligevel stod spørgsmålet tilbage, hvordan indhold på dansk og om Danmark kunne finansieres og formidles i fremtiden.
Igennem hele perioden var internettet det mest konkrete udtryk for den globalisering økonomisk såvel som kulturelt, der med fornyet styrke satte dagsordenen for de danske mediers udvikling.

Dansk mediehistorie 1-4
Dansk mediehistorie fortæller historien om mediernes udvikling i Danmark og giver den første samlede vurdering af deres betydning for dansk kultur.
De fire bind tager udgangspunkt i massemedierne – presse, tidsskrifter, bøger, film, radio, tv, internet – men beskriver også, hvordan massemedierne har spillet sammen med både den dagligdags samtale og de etablerede kunstformer. I medierne mødes det fine med det folkelige og det fremmede med det hjemlige.
Bind 1: Mediernes forhistorie og 1840-1880
Bind 2: 1880-1920 og 1920-1960
Bind 3: 1960-1995
Bind 4: 1995-2015

Læseprøve:
http://wildside.ipapercms.dk/SLFonden/SLforlagene/Samfundslitteratur/Titler/31985/

PhD om internetbrug i Danmark

PhD scholarship in internet research with a focus on Europe (re-advertisement)

The Department of Media, Cognition, and Communication, Faculty of Humanities, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, invites applications for a 3-year PhD scholarship. The successful candidate will be affiliated with the Peoples’ Internet (PIN) project sponsored by the Carlsberg Foundation. The scholarship is expected to begin November 1, 2016, or as soon as possible thereafter.

Description of the project

“The Peoples’ Internet – Market, state, and civil society in China, Europe, and the United States” will undertake a comparative study of the internet in different world regions. Digital networks are among the most flexible and universally applicable technologies ever invented by humans. But the many significant variations in the social uses of the internet around the world remain poorly understood. The PIN project compares the current state and future potential of the internet in three centers of the global economy and world politics – China, Europe, and the United States – focusing on the interplay of civil society with the other two key sectors of modern societies: market and state.

The PhD candidate will be an integral part of the PIN research group. The PhD candidate will participate both in formal project events and in informal deliberations throughout the candidate’s affiliation with the project; will have the opportunity both to pursue personal research interests and to contribute to the overall theoretical and methodological framework of PIN; and will join a wider interdisciplinary research environment centered in the University of Copenhagen’s Center for Communication and Computing and its research group on Digital Communication and Aesthetics. In addition to coursework and other institutional obligations, the PhD candidate will undertake the following main activities:

• six months of ethnographic fieldwork in Denmark
• review of regulatory regimes and cultural traditions in the fieldwork area
• participation in analyses of population surveys
• contributions to the dissemination of project findings and other outreach.

The successful PhD candidate must be fluent in spoken and written academic English, and in Danish. Prior experience with cross-cultural studies and/or survey research within media and communication studies will be considered an advantage, but is not a requirement. It is expected that the successful candidate will be present, part of the research group, and engaged in the activities of PIN on a daily basis. Departing from the PIN project framework, the PhD project description must include:

• a main section outlining preliminary research questions, methodological considerations, and a time schedule for a six-month ethnographic fieldwork in Denmark
• a section identifying preliminary issues to be addressed in a review of regulatory regimes and cultural traditions in Denmark
• a section discussing how insights from the fieldwork may inform and complement the survey component of the PIN project.
Please notice that this position is advertised in parallel with a similar position where the focus is on the USA, see: http://phd.humanities.ku.dk/how_to_apply/calls/phd-scholarship-in-internet-research-with-a-focus-on-the-united-states/

The project proposal must lie within the overall framework of PIN. For further information, including a copy of the project framework, please contact the Principal Investigator of PIN, Professor Klaus Bruhn Jensen kbj@hum.ku.dk

Application deadline: September 15, 2016 at 23.59 (CET), http://phd.humanities.ku.dk/how_to_apply/calls/phd-scholarship-in-internet-research-with-a-focus-on-europe/

NY RAPPORT: MEDIERNES UDVIKLING I DANMARK 2016

Den store, årlige og autoritative rapport om danskernes mediebrug er netop udkommet. Du kan bl.a. læse om, hvordan unge og ældres forbrug af traditionelle medier bevæger sig i hver sin retning, mens de ældre kommer godt med på digitale medier. Avisernes læserflugt er indtil videre bremset, og radiolytningen er i fremgang. Og så bruger vi stadigt flere penge på medier: Fra 1994 til 2014 er den andel, de medierelaterede forbrugsposter udgør af husstandenes samlede forbrug, steget fra 5,5 % til 11,9 %.
Rapporten er et overflødighedshorn af statistik og analyser af medieforbruget, herunder nyhedslæsning, brug af internet og mobiltelefon samt tv-streaming.
Læs den samlede rapport her:
Læs det sammenfattende kapitel om udviklingen her:
Læs pressemeddelelsen her:

Three PhD scholarships in internet research

Three PhD scholarships in internet research

The Department of Media, Cognition, and Communication, Faculty of Humanities, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, invites applications for three 3-year PhD scholarships. The successful candidates will be affiliated with the Peoples’ Internet (PIN) project sponsored by the Carlsberg Foundation. The candidates are expected to begin October 1, 2016, or as soon as possible thereafter.

 

Description of the project

“The Peoples’ Internet – Market, state, and civil society in China, Europe, and the United States” will undertake a comparative study of the internet in different world regions. Digital networks are among the most flexible and universally applicable technologies ever invented by humans. But the many significant variations in the social uses of the internet around the world remain poorly understood. The PIN project compares the current state and future potential of the internet in three centers of the global economy and world politics – China, Europe, and the United States – focusing on the interplay of civil society with the other two key sectors of modern societies: market and state.

 

The PhD candidates will be an integral part of the PIN research group. They will participate both in formal project events and in informal deliberations throughout their affiliation with the project; they will have the opportunity both to pursue personal research interests and to contribute to the overall theoretical and methodological framework of PIN; and they will join a wider interdisciplinary research environment centered in the University of Copenhagen’s Center for Communication and Computing and its research group on Digital Communication and Aesthetics. In addition to coursework and other institutional obligations, the PhD candidates will undertake the following main activities:

  • six months of ethnographic fieldwork (China, Denmark, or the US)
  • review of regulatory regimes and cultural traditions in their fieldwork area
  • participation in analyses of population surveys
  • contributions to the dissemination of project findings and other outreach.

 

 

PhD position # 1: The successful PhD candidate must be fluent in spoken and written academic English, and in Mandarin. Prior experience with cross-cultural studies and/or survey research within media and communication studies will be considered an advantage, but is not a requirement. It is expected that the successful candidate will be present, part of the research group, and engaged in the activities of PIN on a daily basis. Departing from the PIN project framework, the PhD project description must include:

  • a main section outlining preliminary research questions, methodological considerations, and a time schedule for a six-month ethnographic fieldwork in the People’s Republic of China
  • a section identifying preliminary issues to be addressed in a review of regulatory regimes and cultural traditions in China
  • a section discussing how insights from the fieldwork may inform and complement the survey component of the PIN project.

 

PhD position # 2: The successful PhD candidate must be fluent in spoken and written academic English, and in Danish. Prior experience with cross-cultural studies and/or survey research within media and communication studies will be considered an advantage, but is not a requirement. It is expected that the successful candidate will be present, part of the research group, and engaged in the activities of PIN on a daily basis. Departing from the PIN project framework, the PhD project description must include:

  • a main section outlining preliminary research questions, methodological considerations, and a time schedule for a six-month ethnographic fieldwork in Denmark
  • a section identifying preliminary issues to be addressed in a review of regulatory regimes and cultural traditions in Denmark
  • a section discussing how insights from the fieldwork may inform and complement the survey component of the PIN project.

 

PhD position # 3: The successful PhD candidate must be fluent in spoken and written academic English. Prior experience with cross-cultural studies and/or survey research within media and communication studies will be considered an advantage, but is not a requirement. It is expected that the successful candidate will be present, part of the research group, and engaged in the activities of PIN on a daily basis. Departing from the PIN project framework, the PhD project description must include:

  • a main section outlining preliminary research questions, methodological considerations, and a time schedule for a six-month ethnographic fieldwork in the United States of America
  • a section identifying preliminary issues to be addressed in a review of regulatory regimes and cultural traditions in the U.S.
  • a section discussing how insights from the fieldwork may inform and complement the survey component of the PIN project.

 

Please note that the project proposal must lie within the overall framework of PIN. For further information, including a copy of the project framework, please contact the Principal Investigator of PIN, Professor Klaus Bruhn Jensen kbj@hum.ku.dk

 

Please note that all applications must be submitted via the PhD School’s website by using an electronic application system.

 

To see the full version of the call and information on how to apply, please visit the PhD School’s website: http://phd.humanities.ku.dk/how_to_apply/calls/

 

 

Application deadline: July 7, 2016 at 23.59 (CET).?

 

Part of the International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU), and among Europe’s top-ranking universities, the University of Copenhagen promotes research and teaching of the highest international standard. Rich in tradition and modern in outlook, the University gives students and staff the opportunity to cultivate their talent in an ambitious and informal environment. An effective organisation – with good working conditions and a collaborative work culture – creates the ideal framework for a successful academic career.

 

CFP: Political communication in networked societies

Call for submissions to Northern Lights, Volume 15 – Theme issue on:

Political communication in networked societies

Volume editors: Eli Skogerbø and Risto Kunelius

Politics and political communication take place in an increasingly networked, multi-level environment. At the same time, small and large societies alike share major political challenges. Topics such as migration, terrorism and climate change are increasingly discussed on global media networks and through Northern Lights coverpersonal and social media, creating new connections, new constellations of actors and new dynamics in our systems of political communication. Northern Lights invites papers that tackle these changes and challenges in political communication from diverse perspectives and with different methods.

Political processes and decision-making demand political communication. Whether we refer to politicians, organised interests, journalists, citizens or other actors, political communication is important for attitude formation, knowledge and action. Over the past decades, the number of researchers has increased; the research field has expanded thematically and methodologically; and a range of new and old media forms and formats have become objects of study. While there is substantial knowledge of how some of the new social media have been integrated into political communication, there are fewer studies of how the hybridization of the public sphere has an impact on political governance.

Politics is about the governance of society, cooperation and conflict, values and interests. Political communication, accordingly, refers to any use of symbols to act politically and to influence governance. Traditionally, research on political communication has often been tied to national elections and election campaigns. It has provided in-depth analysis of the relationships among elite political actors inside the political system. However, as changes in the communication landscape enable new issues and actors to play new roles, we need to pay more attention to the affordances of the networked, intensively-connected environment, its emerging logic, encounters, and communication practices. Of particular interest today are studies of non-elected political actors and the different strategies, ways and registers with which they communicate to gain influence over political outcomes. Whereas political communication has often concentrated on the triangle of politicians, journalists and citizens/audiences, we open this volume to studies involving a wider set of political actors and interests – including, e.g., bureaucrats, communication advisors, leaders of corporations and organisations, and citizens’ groups.

We encourage articles that study political communication at all levels of politics – from the local to the regional and global levels. Of particular interest are comparative studies over time, across political systems, or between levels of politics.

Research topics may include but are not restricted to:

  • Political actors and communicative forms: What new kinds of political actors are emerging in the wake of the hybridization of public spheres? How do different actors communicate? What does the abundance of channels mean for the contact between actors and citizens? How do different types of actors benefit or suffer from the changes in media technologies and structures?
  • Political journalism: How does the emerging communicative abundance shift power relations between elite sources and journalists? What are the emerging trends in professional political journalism? Are new developments articulated in different ways in different contexts and regions?
  • Political content: What formats and genres are political? How are different formats and genres adapted to networked politics? What is the impact of particular political issues – such as immigration, the environment, or security/terrorism – on the forms and dynamics of political communication? How are issues politicised in the transnational and hybrid public sphere?
  • Political processes: What signifies political communication in networked societies?  What is the significance of “connective action” (Bennett & Segerberg 2013) for political communication? Is there a new role for “affective publics” (Papacharissi 2014) and emotions in political processes? Does the “hybrid media system” (Chadwick 2013) mean shifts in communicative power? How are communication strategies in election campaigns changing? What new roles do social movements play in particular political processes – and how do they function?
  • Mediation and mediatization of politics: A wide body of recent literature has been working on the mediatization of politics – also in relation to new media. How does mediatization research contribute to the understanding of the structural and institutional changes in media and politics and, thus, in political communication?

Please send an extended abstract of 500-600 words to volume editor Professor Eli Skogerbø (eli.skogerbo@media.uio.no)

Deadline for abstract submission: 1 April 2016

Notification to authors: 15 April 2016
Final article submission: 1 September 2016
Publication: Spring 2017

Additional information about the journal is available on the Intellect Press website: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=143/view,page=2/

 

Associate Professorship in Communication and IT, University of Copenhagen

A position as Associate Professor in Communication and IT is available at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, beginning August 1, 2016.

The candidate should have a clear research profile within Communication and IT as well as excellent teaching qualifications within programmes in communication and it. Research and teaching in communication and IT at the Department of Media, Cognition and Communication is interdisciplinary, encompassing a range of humanistic and social-scientific approaches to theoretical and empirical studies of the intersection between human communication and digital computing. Documented research experience with the social and cultural implications of digital infrastructures will be considered an advantage in assessing applicants’ qualifications.

The deadline for applications is January 15, 2016. More information at, http://jobportal.ku.dk/videnskabelige-stillinger/?show=787505

New Directions in Mediatization Research: Culture, Conflict and Organizations

International research seminar, October 1-2, 2015.

Venue: University of Copenhagen, Amager Campus, Auditorium 27.0.17.

Mediatization research has now established itself as a prominent theoretical framework and a field of empirical inquiry. The first wave of mediatization studies was concerned with the study of mass media and their influence not least on the political system. The second wave of mediatization research has broadened the scope and considered mass media, interpersonal media, and social network media in relation to a wider set of social and cultural domains like sports, family and conflict. In this international seminar we want to make a status of the field of mediatization research at the same time as we would like to look ahead and discuss possible developments and challenges, both theoretically and empirically.

The agenda of this seminar is divided into three thematic areas within which mediatization research has made recent contributions: Culture, conflict, organization. A fourth theme concerns the status and future of the field of mediatization research. Each of the themes will be addressed by a series of keynote presentations.

To register for this seminar with or without paper, please read the full cfp:

http://mediatization.ku.dk/nyheder/new_directions/

Confirmed speakers for the seminar include:

Marian Thomas Adolf, Associate Professor, Department of Communication & Cultural Management, Zeppelin University

Lynn Schofield Clark, Professor, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies University of Denver

Knut Lundby, Professor, Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo

Peter Lunt, Professor, Department of Media and Communication, University of Leicester

Josef Pallas, Associate professor, Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University

Caja Thimm, Professor, Department of Language, Media and Music, University of Bonn

ONE DAY SYMPOSIUM: DEMOCRACY & CITIZENSHIP IN DIGITAL SOCIETY

JUNE 19, 2015 from 9:00 to 16:30

IT University of Copenhagen, Aud.2

Join us for a day’s inspiring presentations and debates about the multiple ways in which digital technologies challenge and provide opportunities for society, citizens and democracy

Keynotes

StepColeman in Charlotte fall 2012hen Coleman from Leeds University (UK):                        Democratic Politics and Citizen Entitlements  

 

 

Anders Albrechtslund Anders Albrechtslund from Aarhus University (DK):                   Tracking Culture: Surveillance in the sphere of intimacy

 

 

Gitte Stald, IT UGitte Staldniversity of Copenhagen:                                            What do citizens need in order to make sense of media?

 

 

Plus research presentations from a number of DECIDIS  participants.

Participation is free but registration is necessary. Send e-mail with name and affiliation to: decidisadmin@itu.dk

Find more information about the program and practical information here.

DECIDIS EVENT: ELECTION ACTIVISM ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Join us on the 24th of April to an interesting public event about the use of social media in an election and referendum context.

What are the experiences of using social media to inform about, impact and discuss elections and important referendums in European countries? And in that context: what role do and should social media play in a democratic society?

Speakers include Stewart Kirkpatrick, digital manager of the “Yes Scotland” campaign and Jaquou Utopie a critical political voice in the Greek Twitter sphere.

The talks will be followed by an open panel debate with the invited speakers and social media researchers Jakob Linaa Jensen (DMJX) and Lisbeth Klastrup (ITU).

Participation is free and open for all, but please sign up by sending a short mail with name and affiliation to: decidisadmin@itu.dk 
with “DECIDIS election event April” as the subject line.

Date and time: April 24th 2015 | 13.00 – 15.30
Location: The IT University of Copenhagen
Auditorium 2 (entrance from atrium, ground floor)

Interested in the scholarly use of web archives?

Registration is now open for non-presenters for the conference Web Archives as scholarly Sources: Issues, Practices and Perspectives taking place 8-10 June 2015 at Aarhus University in Denmark.

The conference seeks to explore the potential of web archives for scholarly use, to highlight innovative research, to investigate the challenges and opportunities of working with the archived web, to identify opportunities for incorporating web archives in learning and teaching, and to discuss and inform archival provision. This multi-disciplinary conference is aimed at scholars, web archiving institutions, web archivists, curators, IT-developers, companies and public institutions interested in web archiving and research using web archives.

The conference is organised by RESAW, Aarhus University, the State and University Library (Denmark), the Royal Library (Denmark), l’Institut des sciences de la communication du CNRS, Université de Lille 3, the Institute of Historical Research (University of London), the University of Amsterdam, the British Library, and Leibniz University Hannover/ALEXANDRIA.

Read more: http://resaw.eu/events/international-conference-aarhus-june-2015/ 

Registration for non-presenters takes place at: https://auws.au.dk/resaw2015nonpresenters. Please note that there are a limited number of seats for non-presenters.

CfP: TV in the age of transnationalisation and transmedialisation

Call for papers for TV in the age of transnationalisation and transmedialisation: a two-day, international conference
Date: Monday 22nd and Tuesday 23rd JUNE 2015
Venue: University of Roehampton, London, UK
Organisers: ECREA Television Studies section and the Media Across Borders network (www.mediaacrossborders.com)

Television is crossing borders in multiple ways. Throughout much of the 20th century it seemed to resemble the geometrical elements of a Kandinsky painting from the Bauhaus phase: each element clearly distinct but overlapping and carefully positioned in relation to other elements. Television was perceived and studied similarly; mostly separate from the other mass media, including film, radio, video games or consumer magazines. Moreover, in Europe television content was clearly separated from advertising through the distinction, or separation principle. In addition to these distinct media elements, state borders clearly separated television markets in the perception of academics, audiences and TV executives. After all, television was mostly conceived and regulated by state institutions and predominately broadcast and consumed within state borders. Cross-border production and trade in television programmes were consequently viewed as international; organised between national institutions and companies. But gradual and ongoing transnationalisation and transmedialisation are making the neat geometrical forms more and more permeable, manifold and unsteady. Kokoschka’s style of painting, blurred and blended, seems a more appropriate metaphor to describe today’s television-scapes. This conference offers a space to reflect on the changes pertaining to the processes and workings of transmedialisation and transnationalisation, and on the theoretical and methodological consequences this has for television studies. It also offers opportunities for networking.

Read the complete call for papers here: CfP ECREA MAB conference June 2015.

Formiddagskonference om medieetik og journalistiske kvaliteter

Kulturstyrelsen inviterer til formiddagskonference om medieetik og journalistiske kvaliteter den 25. februar 2015. På konferencen vil resultaterne fra to omfattende undersøgelser, som Roskilde Universitet har gennemført for Kulturstyrelsens ”Rapportering om mediernes udvikling i Danmark”, blive præsenteret og debatteret.

Se invitationen her: Invitation_Etik og Kvalitet.